Komentarze

09.10.19, 12:08
A very nice article. I also had some similar experiences when I came to Germany. Somehow people try to throw this topic under the carpet and politicians are also afraid of being called racist if they raise questions about integration. The definition of integration and assimilation shall be clarified. Language plays a vital role in getting integrated. I recently read a consensus which stated that every forth immigrant between age 18 to 32 doesn't like German culture and doesn't want to integrate. Although they speak the language to some extent but it is culture, they never associate themselves with the culture and never feel themselves as a part of the society.
Waqas
09.10.19, 12:08
I think you dont have to become part of the society 1oo%... everybody has his/her own religion, culture, habbit and so on... but since someone chose to live here day by day, than has to make some sacrifices... :)
fodortekla
fodortekla
09.10.19, 12:08
This is also considered a huge problem in the Netherlands and the main reason why right wing populists are now having so much influence. But if my experience of living abroad gave me one thing, it is understanding towards the position of immigrants. They mainly live concentrated based on ethnic and linquistic group, so they can speak their own language and practice their own culture amongst themselves. My situation was simular. I was surrounded by an EVS community and more liberal Macedonian youngsters so I could maintain my Western-European identity and speak mainly English. When it comes to taking the big step of going to a new country, it is comforting that you can be somewhat in your own comfort zone and express some of yourself (both language whise as well as culture wise) The problem is that most people are not challenged to take it any further eventually. They accept a narrowed life that is based on what their current possibilities are of communicating, rather than to try and expend their skills. It takes a lot of practice and effort to learn a whole new language and to engage in new interactions, and lets face it, Western-Europeans (or at least Dutch people) are not the most welcoming. This is what I have experienced with EVS volunteers who did their EVS in the Netherlands. Nobody took an effort to take them in. I felt ashamed of my fellow country men. So why should these people than do an effort to engage in interaction with people who are not particular motivated to take them in? Well, the answer is that it will expend their possibilities. I now live in Serbia and I am motivated to learn the language, eventhough I can speak English with almost everybody around me. Just for the sake of feeling connected to my enviroment. But than again, here I am the only Dutch person. Who knows how it would be if there were whole neighborhoods full of them. And intergating culturewise? No, I am not going to change my mentality towards life and relations. I think it is stupid to ask that from people. The core idea is that every interaction is from one person to another and that you feel connected with that person or not. And since a person is also shaped by his culture this is something that has to be preserved. I think it will really wreck a lot in the uniqueness of relations when everybody has to unifie based on some artifical idea of what the dominant culture and related behaviour should be. Just follow the laws that count in a certain country and be respectfull and understanding towards their attitudes. That will get you a long way.
RamonMartensen

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